NaMTOK QUESTIONS - PAGE 2

WHY CONSULT NaMTOK, RATHER THAN ANY OTHER MAORI GROUP?

In 1996 the Maori Queen, Te Arikinui, Dame Te Atairangikaahu, became concerned that large tracts of land in and around Hamilton City were being developed without any consideration of Maori views and opinions. To address this issue she directed several senior elders (kaumatua) to form an organisation which would represent the views of the Maori people of the area (Tangata Whenua) in all matters to do with land. Thus Nga Mana Toopu O Kirikiriroa was formed, mandated directly by the Maori Queen.

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WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN NaMTOK AND TAINUI?

Tainui consists of four major Iwi: Waikato, Maniopoto, Hauraki and Raukawa. The New Zealand Government recognises each of these Iwi as an Iwi Authority. Each Iwi Authority deals with major issues of national or regional significance on behalf of the Iwi, such as Tribal governance, Treaty claims and the Waikato River. The Waikato Tainui Iwi Authority is based at Hopu Hopu.

Each Iwi consists of a number of hapu. The hapu deal with local rather than national issues and hence work mostly with the local and district Councils, rather than central Government.

NaMTOK represents five of the largest hapu: Ngati Wairere, Ngati Mahanga, Ngati Haua, Ngati Koroki, Ngati Tama Inupo, of Waikato Tainui. Together these five hapu contain about a quarter of the total Waikato Iwi.

NaMTOK deals with all land based issues for the land within a triangle stretching approximately from Raglan to Taupiri to Tauwhare. NaTOK does not at present deal with issues associated with the Waikato river and any such matters should be directed to the Iwi Authority at Hopu Hopu.

 

 

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WHAT RIGHT DO MAORI HAVE TO SAY WHAT I CAN DO WITH MY LAND?

Maori believe that the land itself, along with all things which live on or in the land, have a life force (Mauri). Thus all creatures, plants and man are inextricably linked to the land (whenua).

Prior to the arrival of Europeans in the Waikato in the early 1800's, Maori had owned, lived on, cultivated and hunted the lands of the region for centuries. Their beliefs and associated ceremonies and religious rites resulted in many Taonga (sacred items) and Koiwi (human remains) being buried throughout the lands of the region.

Hence, the lands of the region, and the Taonga which are buried in them, have a special cultural significance to Maori.

Prior to the enactment of the RMA developments often proceeded with no regard to the Maori history of the land under development. Hence, such developments not only destroyed the Taonga buried in the land, but also desecrated the Mauri (life force) of the land.

In the 1980's the New Zealand Government began to address Maori issues and grievances, and to take cognizance of Maori values and culture. This eventually lead to the embodiment of the right of Maori to have their cultural values and beliefs considered where any land is altered in any way.

Hence, under the Act, land developers and bodies who administer or control land developments, such as local authorities are required to take notice of Maori culture and concerns associated with their historic lands

When undertaking consultation under the RMA, NaMTOK do not attempting to stop or limit developments. Rather we find a least cost solution which satisfies Maori cultural concerns and allows the development to proceed. In this way NaMTOK aims to benefit the community as a whole, rather than one individual.

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NGA MANA TOOPU O KIRIKIRI - "Providing Iwi Environmental Solutions"